Ansel Adams Wilderness Map

Ansel Adams Map USDA


Ansel Adams Wilderness, part of Inyo NF and Sierra NF

This High Sierra terrain spans some of the most majestic areas of the Sierra Nevada – the youngest mountain range in the U.S. This wilderness is bordered by National Parks, National Forests, and other Wilderness Areas – all the way around it. Kaiser Wilderness and Lake Edison inside Sierra NF on the west, Yosemite National Park on the north, Inyo NF on the east side, and John Muir Wilderness on the south end. Wow!

This 230,300 acre, high elevation wilderness was formerly the Minarets Wilderness, renamed in 1984 to honor the pioneering landscape photographer, Ansel Adams. Known for spectacular alpine scenery, elevations range from 7,000 to 14,000 feet. Rugged granite peaks and passes, with alpine lakes, includes high country east of the Sierra crest. Pacific Crest Trail and John Muir Trail cross this High Sierra Wilderness region.

This USDA map is also available at Ranger Stations.

Perfect for packing and hiking references, fishing lakes, creeks, high altitude camp sites, horse packing routes, or extended backpacking adventures. Map Scale = 1″ to mile; Printed on waterproof plastic paper. Updated in 2011. ISBN# 9781593515188

minarets

see also –

Eastern Sierra Trail Map

Ansel Adams Wilderness Trail Map
by Tom Harrison Topo Maps

NatGeo Ansel Adams Map #309 Yosemite SE

Ansel Adams Trailhead locations include –

Eastern Sierra: Lee Vining, June Lake, Mammoth Lakes, CA

Western Sierra: Edison Lake (pictured below), Huntington Lake, Shaver Lake, Clover Meadow, Mammoth Pool Reservoir, NorthFork via Bass Lake and Yosemite National Park.

Edison Lake

Ansel Adams Wilderness Books

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Ansel Adams Wilderness Books


Ansel Adams Wilderness Books

The Ansel Adams Wilderness is a wilderness area in the Sierra Nevada of California, United States. The wilderness spans 231,533 acres – much of which is located inside the Inyo and Sierra National Forests, and the remaining acres covers nearly all of Devils Postpile National Monument. Yosemite National Park lies to the north and northwest, while the John Muir Wilderness lies to the south.

The wilderness was established as part of the original Wilderness Act in 1964 as the Minarets Wilderness. The 109,500-acre Minarets Wilderness was created by enlarging and renaming the Mount Dana-Minarets Primitive Area. In 1984, after his death, the area was expanded and renamed in memory of Ansel Adams, well-known environmentalist and nature photographer who is famous for his black-and-white landscape photographs of the Sierra Nevada.

The Ansel Adams wilderness spans in elevation from 3,500 to 13,157 feet, forming the northern end of the High Sierra. The centerpiece of the Ansel Adams wilderness is the Ritter Range, which includes dark meta-volcanic glaciated mountains such as Mount Ritter, Banner Peak, and The Minarets.

Immediately to the east of the Ritter Range is the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River, which contains Devils Postpile, a series of basaltic columns that were revealed and smoothed by glacier action. The Middle Fork originates from Thousand Island Lake, at the foot of Banner Peak, one of the largest backcountry lakes in the Sierra.

To the east of the Middle Fork canyon is the true Sierra Crest, which, at roughly 10,000 feet of elevation is lower than the Ritter Range. This relatively low region of the Crest allows winter storms through and cause large amounts of snowfall on Mammoth Mountain, which sits in the gap. The gap also allows migration of plants and animals across the Sierra Crest.

To the west of the Ritter Range lies the canyon of the North Fork of the San Joaquin, a relatively remote and unvisited high-country area. The southern part of the wilderness contains the 3,000 feet deep canyon of the main San Joaquin River, which flows out of the Sierra Nevada to California’s Central Valley.


Ansel Adams Wilderness Books