Merced Tuolumne Rivers Map

Merced & Tuolumne Rivers Map

BLM Merced River

Merced Tuolumne Rivers Map

Merced Tuolumne Rivers MapNational Geographic Trails Illustrated
Merced & Tuolumne Rivers Map #808

Stanislaus National Forest

NatGeo Wild & Scenic Rivers, Calaveras Big Trees State Park, Ebbetts Pass, Hwy 4, Route 140 Scenic Byways, Pinecrest Lake National Recreation Trail, River Access Points. Campgrounds, trailhead parking, picnic grounds, all paved roads & dirt roads.

Full Color, 2 -sided map. GPS Compatible, Full UTM Grid. Waterproof ISBN# 9781566952415

river map

fishing map

Merced Tuolumne Rivers Map

see also –

Emigrant Wilderness Books
Emigrant Wilderness Maps
Gold Country Maps
Stanislaus National Forest Map
Stanislaus Forest Atlas
Tuolumne Meadows Trail Map
Yosemite Maps by NatGeo
Yosemite Trail Maps by Tom Harrison

Yosemite River Map

Merced River in Yosemite NP

Merced River in Yosemite NP

Sequoia Books

Sequoia Groves in California

Find Maps for Kern River Canyon
(Sequoia National Forest)
Find Kings Canyon High Country Map
Find Maps for Kings Cyn & Sequoia National Parks

Books on the Southern Sierra Mountains, Calaveras Big Trees, Sequoia National Forest & Sequoia National Park

Sequoia Books

Sequoia Books

Sequoia Books

Sequoia Books

Sequoia Books

Sequoia Books

Giant Sequoia are the most massive individual trees in the world. They grow to an average height of 164–279 feet with trunk diameters ranging from 20–26 feet. Record trees have been measured at 311 feet tall. The specimen known to have the greatest diameter at breast height is the General Grant tree at 28.9 feet.

The oldest known giant sequoia is approximately 3,200 years old based on dendrochronology. Giant sequoias are among the oldest living organisms on Earth. Giant sequoia bark is fibrous, furrowed, and may be 3 feet thick at the base of the columnar trunk. The sap contains tannic acid, which provides significant protection from fire damage. The leaves are evergreen, awl-shaped and arranged spirally on the shoots.

The giant sequoia regenerates by seed. The seed cones are 1–3 inches long and mature in 18–20 months, though they typically remain green and closed for as long as 20 years. Each cone has 30–50 spirally arranged scales, with several seeds on each scale, giving an average of 230 seeds per cone. Seeds are dark brown, yellow-brown wing along each side. Some seeds shed when the cone scales shrink during hot weather in late summer, but most are liberated by insect damage or when the cone dries from the heat of fire. Young trees start to bear cones after 12 years.

Sequoia Books

Giant Sequoia Trees on Western Divide Highway